NM Legislature

NM Legislature

Summary

The New Mexico Legislature (Spanish: Legislatura de Nuevo México) is the legislative branch of the state government of New Mexico. It is a bicameral body made up of the New Mexico House of Representatives and the New Mexico Senate.

Source: Wikipedia

OnAir Post: NM Legislature

News

What prevailed
State budget: Near the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, state economists projected a nearly $1 billion budget shortfall in the fiscal year that starts July 1. Thanks to an infusion of federal pandemic relief money and much more optimistic revenue projections from oil and gas, the state government will increase spending by 4.8 percent, or $373 million. The proposed $7.4 billion budget passed both chambers in the final days of the session and is now headed to the governor.
Pandemic relief: Those hit hardest by the pandemic will benefit from Senate Bill 3, which the governor signed into law. It offers long-term, low-interest loans up to $150,000 to eligible New Mexico businesses and nonprofits.

Abortion rights: Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham made history when she signed Senate Bill 10, striking a 1969 law from the books that made it a crime to perform an abortion. The move came after weeks of emotional testimony from people on both sides of the argument as abortion-rights advocates feared a conservative majority on the U.S. Supreme Court might weaken or overturn the historic Roe v. Wade ruling.

About

Source: Wikipedia

History

The New Mexico Legislature was established when New Mexico officially became a state and was admitted to the union in 1912. In 1922, Bertha M. Paxton became the first woman elected to the New Mexico Legislature, serving one term in the House of Representatives.

Session structure and operations

The Legislature meets in regular session on the third Tuesday in January of each odd-numbered year. The New Mexico Constitution limits the regular session to 60 calendar days, every other year it is 30 days.[ The lieutenant governor presides over the Senate, while the Speaker of the House is elected from that body in a closed-door majority-member caucus. Both have wide latitude in choosing committee membership in their respective houses and have a large impact on lawmaking in the state.

While only the Governor can call the Legislature into special sessions, the Legislature can call itself into an extraordinary session. The Governor may call as many sessions as he or she wishes. The New Mexico Constitution does not limit the duration of each special session; lawmakers may consider only those issues designated by the Governor in his or her “call,” or proclamation convening the special session (though other issues may be added by the Governor during a session).

Any bill passed by the Legislature and signed by the Governor takes effect 90 days after its passage unless two-thirds of each house votes to give the bill immediate effect, earlier effect (before 90 day period), or later effect (after 90 day period).

Districting

The legislature consists of 70 representatives and 42 senators. Each member of the House represents roughly 25,980 residents of New Mexico. Each member of the Senate represents roughly 43,300 residents. Currently the Democratic Party holds a majority in both of the chambers of New Mexico Legislature, and holds the Governor’s office.

Redistricting

A legislative committee is assigned by the governor to meet every 10 years based on the outcome of the United States Census to redistrict the boundaries of districts for the state legislature, and congressional districts.

Term limits

Currently, there are no term limits for legislators. The longest current member of the legislature has served since 1972. House members are elected every 2 years, while Senate members are elected every 4 years.

Party summary

State Senate

  27 Democrats
  15 Republicans
AffiliationParty

(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
DemocraticRepublicanVacant
End of previous legislature2715420
Jan 1, 2015 – Mar 14, 20152517420
Mar 14, 2015 – Apr 5, 20152417411
Apr 5, 2015 – Jan 17, 20172418420
Jan 17, 2017 – Jan 19, 20212616420
Jan 19, 2021 – present2715420

House of Representatives

  44 Democrats
  24 Republicans
  1 vacancy
AffiliationParty

(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
DemocraticIndRepublicanVacant
51st legislature38032700
52nd legislature33037700
53rd legislature38032700
54th legislature46123700
55th legislature43224691

Wikipedia

The New Mexico Legislature (Spanish: Legislatura de Nuevo México) is the legislative branch of the state government of New Mexico. It is a bicameral body made up of the New Mexico House of Representatives and the New Mexico Senate.

History

The New Mexico Legislature was established when New Mexico officially became a state and was admitted to the union in 1912. In 1922, Bertha M. Paxton became the first woman elected to the New Mexico Legislature, serving one term in the House of Representatives.[1]

Session structure and operations

The Legislature meets every year, in regular session on the third Tuesday in January. The New Mexico Constitution limits the regular session to 60 calendar days, every other year it is 30 days.[2] The lieutenant governor presides over the Senate, while the Speaker of the House is elected from that body in a closed-door majority-member caucus. Both have wide latitude in choosing committee membership in their respective houses and have a large impact on lawmaking in the state.

While only the Governor can call the Legislature into special sessions, the Legislature can call itself into an extraordinary session. There is no limit on the number of special sessions a governor can call. The New Mexico Constitution does not limit the duration of each special session; lawmakers may consider only those issues designated by the governor in the "call," or proclamation convening the special session (though other issues may be added by the Governor during a session).[3]

Any bill passed by the Legislature and signed by the governor takes effect 90 days after its passage unless two-thirds of each house votes to give the bill immediate effect, earlier effect (before 90 day period), or later effect (after 90 day period).

Compensation

New Mexico does not pay its legislators a base salary. Legislators receive per diem of $165 for work at the capitol or committee hearings during January and February, going up to $194 during March.[4]

Qualifications

The state constitution requires representatives to be at least twenty-one years old and senators to be at least twenty-five, and members of both houses must live in the districts they represent.[5]

Districting

The legislature consists of 70 representatives and 42 senators. Each member of the House represents roughly 25,980 residents of New Mexico. Each member of the Senate represents roughly 43,300 residents. Currently the Democratic Party holds a majority in both of the chambers of New Mexico Legislature, and holds the Governor's office.[6]

Redistricting

In 2021, Senate Bill 304 established the Citizen Redistricting Committee. The committee is to develop three redistricting plans to recommend to the Legislature for each of the following: U.S. House of Representatives, New Mexico House of Representatives, New Mexico Senate, and any other state offices requiring redistricting. As of the summer of 2021, the latter consisted of only the New Mexico Public Education Commission. The Legislature is still free to make its own redistricting plans.[7]

Term limits

Currently, there are no term limits for legislators. The longest current member of the legislature has served since 1972.[citation needed] House members are elected every two years, while Senate members are elected every four years.[8]

Party summary

State Senate

  27 Democrats
AffiliationParty
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
DemocraticRepublicanVacant
End of previous legislature2715420
Jan 1, 2015 - Mar 14, 20152517420
Mar 14, 2015 - Apr 5, 20152417411
Apr 5, 2015 – Jan 17, 20172418420
Jan 17, 2017 – Jan 19, 20212616420
Jan 19, 2021 – present2715420

House of Representatives

  44 Democrats
  1 vacancy
AffiliationParty
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
DemocraticIndRepublicanVacant
51st legislature38032700
52nd legislature33037700
53rd legislature38032700
54th legislature46123700
55th legislature43224691
56th legislature45025700

History

SessionYearsHouseSenateGovernor
TotalDemocratsRepublicansOthersTotalDemocratsRepublicansOthers
1st1912–19144916303247161William W. McDonald
2nd1915-19164914332247161
3rd1917-1918491930-241014-Ezequiel Cabeza De Baca
Washington E. Lindsey
4th1919-1920491534-24915-Octaviano Larrazolo
5th1921-1922491534-24915-Merritt C. Mechem
6th1923-1924493316-24915-James F. Hinkle
7th1925-1926492821-241113-Arthur T. Hannett
8th1927-1928491831-241113-Richard C. Dillon
9th1929-1930491237-24618
10th1931-1932492821-24816-Arthur Seligman
11th1933-193449418-24204-
427-Andrew W. Hockenhull
12th1935-1936493812-24186-Clyde Tingley
13th1937-193849472-24231-
14th1939-194049427-24231-John E. Miles
15th1941-194249409-24213-
16th1943-1944493316-24213-John J. Dempsey
17th1945-1946493019-24186-
18th1947-1948493019-24186-Thomas J. Mabry
19th1949-1950493613-24195-
SessionYearsHouseSenateGovernor
TotalDemocratsRepublicansOthersTotalDemocratsRepublicansOthers
20th1951-195255469-24186-Edwin L. Mechem
21st1953-1954552728-31229-
22nd1955-195655514-32239-John F. Simms
23rd1957-1958664323-32248-Edwin L. Mechem
24th1959-196066606-32248-John Burroughs
25th1961-196266597-32284-Edwin L. Mechem
Tom Bolack
26th1963-1964665511-32284-Jack M. Campbell
27th1965-1966775918-32284-
28th1967-1968704525-422517-David F. Cargo
29th1969-1970704426-422517-
30th1971-1972704822-422814-Bruce King
31st1973-1974705119-423012-
5020-
32nd1975-1976705119-422913-Jerry Apodaca
3012-
33rd1977-1978704822-42339-
34th1979-1980704129[a]-42339-Bruce King
3210-
35th1981-1982704129[b]-422220-
2319-
36th1983-1984704624-422319-Toney Anaya
4723-
37th1985-1986704327[c]-422121[d]-
2022-
4220[e]22
38th1987-1988704723-4221[f]21-Garrey Carruthers
4624-422121[g]
39th1989-1990704525-422616-
2517-
SessionYearsHouseSenateGovernor
TotalDemocratsRepublicansOthersTotalDemocratsRepublicansOthers
40th1991-1992704921-422616-Bruce King
41st1993-1994705317-422715-
42nd1995-1996704624-422715-Gary Johnson
43rd1997-1998704228-422517-
44th1999-2000704030-422517-
45th2001-2002704228-422418[h]-
46th2003-2004704327-422418-Bill Richardson
47th2005-2006704228-422418-
48th2007-2008704228-422418-
49th2009-2010704525-422715[i]-
50th2011-20127036331422715[i]-Susana Martinez
51st2013-2014703832-422517-
52nd2015-2016703337-422418-
53rd2017-2018703832-422616-
54th2019-2020704624-422616-Michelle Lujan Grisham
55th2021-20227044242422715-
SessionYearsTotalDemocratsRepublicansOthersTotalDemocratsRepublicansOthersGovernor
HouseSenate

Notes

  1. ^ Coalition of 11 Democrats and 29 Republicans controlled the House Majority
  2. ^ Coalition of 10 Democrats and 27 Republicans controlled the House Majority
  3. ^ Coalition of 10 Democrats and 26 Republicans controlled the House Majority
  4. ^ Coalition of 4 Democrats and 21 Republicans controlled the Senate Majority until one of the Democrats switched parties in late 1985, giving the Republicans outright control
  5. ^ Coalition of 4 Republicans and 19 Democrats controlled the Senate Majority in the 37th Session's special legislative session in September 1986.
  6. ^ Coalition of 3 Republicans and 21 Democrats controlled the Senate Majority
  7. ^ Coalition of 5 Democrats and 18 Republicans controlled the Senate Majority beginning in January 1988
  8. ^ Coalition of 3 Democrats and 18 Republicans controlled the Senate Majority
  9. ^ a b Coalition of 8 Democrats and 15 Republicans controlled the Senate Majority

References

  1. ^ Eisenstadt, Pauline; Belshaw, Jim (2012). A Woman in Both Houses: My Career in New Mexico Politics. University of New Mexico Press. ISBN 9780826350244.
  2. ^ "SESSION DATES" (PDF). New Mexico Legislature. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 15, 2019. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  3. ^ "New Mexico Statutes". Archived from the original on May 5, 2012. Retrieved June 12, 2012.
  4. ^ "2022 Legislator Compensation". ncsl.org.
  5. ^ "Constitution (AS ADOPTED JANUARY 21, 1911, AND AS SUBSEQUENTLY AMENDED BY THE PEOPLE IN GENERAL AND SPECIAL ELECTIONS 1911 THROUGH 2021" (PDF). Api.realfile.rtsclients.com. Retrieved July 24, 2022.
  6. ^ "Political Composition". Nmlegia.gov.
  7. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on July 25, 2021. Retrieved August 8, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "LEGISLATIVE TERM LIMITS AND FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME LEGISLATURES" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on December 25, 2010. Retrieved June 12, 2012.

External links

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