Martin Heinrich – NM

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position: US Representative for NM-01 from 2009 – 2013
Other Positions:   Vice Chair, Joint Economic Committee

After a brief stint doing mechanical drawings, Heinrich worked as an AmeriCorps fellow in New Mexico. From 1996 to 2001 Heinrich served as executive director of the Cottonwood Gulch Foundation, a New Mexico nonprofit organization dedicated to educating young people on natural science and the environment.

In 2002 he founded his own public affairs consulting firm. Martin Heinrich, in 2004 to 2008, served on the Albuquerque City Council, representing the 6th district. In February 2006 Governor Bill Richardson appointed Heinrich to be the state’s Natural Resources Trustee.

Quotes:
Our National Labs are driving the energy transition forward every single day.

Heinrich Speaks on Importance of For The People Act with ABC News Live

OnAir Post: Martin Heinrich – NM

News

About

Source: Government page

Martin HeinrichServing on the Senate Armed Services Committee, Heinrich is deeply committed to ensuring our men and women in uniform are prepared for the threats they face and making sure we keep our promises to those who serve. New Mexico plays a pivotal role in our national security. The state is home to several military installations – Kirtland Air Force Base, Holloman Air Force Base, Cannon Air Force Base, Fort Bliss, and White Sands Missile Range – two major national laboratories – Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories – and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Through his role on the committee, Heinrich has secured new missions and made sure the personnel at New Mexico’s defense installations have the resources and support they need to keep the nation safe.

An avid sportsman and conservationist, Heinrich works to protect New Mexico’s public lands, watersheds, and wildlife for future generations. He worked with local communities to designate the Río Grande del Norte and Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monuments. Heinrich also led the effort to create the Ah-Shi-Sle-Pah and Columbine-Hondo Wilderness Areas, open up public access to the Sabinoso Wilderness, establish the Manhattan Project National Historical Park in Los Alamos, and transition the Valles Caldera National Preserve to National Park Service management. Heinrich serves as a member of the Migratory Bird Commission, where he helps approve grants to restore and conserve essential wildlife habitat. Heinrich is working to pass legislation to upgrade Bandelier and White Sands National Monuments into new national parks. He is also leading the effort to pass bipartisan sportsmen’s legislation to extend key conservation programs and improve public access to public lands for hunting, fishing, and other outdoor recreation.

With its abundance of solar and wind resources and energy research hubs, New Mexico can lead the way in combating the devastating effects of climate change and modernizing our nation’s electrical grid. In 2015, Heinrich helped negotiate the long-term extension of renewable energy tax credits that support New Mexico’s growing clean energy industries. Heinrich introduced legislation to prepare New Mexico’s workforce for good-paying clean energy jobs. He has also supported the development of renewable energy projects on public and tribal lands, the adoption of innovative energy storage and battery technologies, and improvement to the security of our nation’s energy infrastructure.

To build a brighter economic future, Heinrich believes in investments in communities and the next generation of New Mexicans. Heinrich supports major investments in early childhood education, public schools, and health care. He introduced the bipartisan Two Generation Economic Empowerment Act to help states like New Mexico coordinate programs across human services, workforce development, education, and health care agencies so they can work more effectively to put parents and children on the path to success. He has also long championed strengthening the education pipeline for science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers for all students including women and minorities.

Heinrich supports legislation to keep our promise to veterans, raise the federal minimum wage, close the gender wage gap, reduce the burden of student loan debt, ensure LGBTQ Americans have equal rights under federal law, and prevent violence against women. Representing a diverse border state, Heinrich is a leading voice for fixing our nation’s broken immigration system, meeting the security needs of border communities, and creating jobs by attracting more trade through New Mexico’s ports of entry. He has also introduced legislation to boost technology transfer and foster collaboration between New Mexico’s national laboratories, local businesses, and research institutions to help turn innovative technologies and materials developed in New Mexico into commercial businesses with great potential to grow and create jobs.

Heinrich is also a leader in protecting American constitutional liberties. As a member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, he was an original cosponsor of the USA FREEDOM Act, a law passed in 2015 that ended the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone and other records and ensured more accountability and transparency from the government surveillance agencies. Heinrich strongly supported the release of the Intelligence Committee’s report on the CIA’s detention and interrogation program during the Bush administration, and he continues to support reforms to prevent the future use of torture.

Heinrich is a member of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus, Senate Outdoor Industry Caucus, Senate Climate Action Task Force, Special Committee on the Climate Crisis, Senate Democratic Hispanic Task Force, National Service Congressional Caucus, Congressional Dietary Supplement Caucus, and the founder of the Congressional Directed Energy Caucus and the Senate Artificial Intelligence (AI) Caucus.

Prior to being elected to the U.S. Senate, Heinrich served two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. In the House, Heinrich voted to cut taxes for the middle class, worked to make college more affordable, improved benefits for veterans, opposed cuts to Social Security and Medicare, and championed the DREAM Act as an original cosponsor. Heinrich authored the HEARTH Act to remove barriers to homeownership for American Indian families and led the effort in Congress to reauthorize the Indian Health Care Improvement Act. As a member of the House Armed Services Committee, Heinrich secured language in the National Defense Authorization Act of 2010 that prohibited the retirement of the 150th Fighter Wing from Kirtland Air Force Base, which helped preserve 1,000 jobs.

Before he was elected to Congress, Heinrich served four years as an Albuquerque City Councilor and was elected as City Council President. During his time on City Council, Heinrich championed successful efforts to raise the city minimum wage, address crime through community policing, support local small businesses, make Albuquerque a leader in energy and water conservation, and fought for campaign finance reform. He also served as New Mexico’s Natural Resources Trustee, working to conserve the state’s outdoor heritage.

After completing a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Missouri, Heinrich and his wife, Julie, moved to Albuquerque where he began his career as a contractor working on directed energy technology at Phillips Laboratories, which is now Air Force Research Laboratory at Kirtland Air Force Base. Heinrich later served in AmeriCorps for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and was the Executive Director of the Cottonwood Gulch Foundation. He also led the Coalition for New Mexico Wilderness and founded a small public affairs consulting firm.

Heinrich’s principled leadership is driven by his working-class upbringing, his wife, Julie, his two sons, and the people of New Mexico.

Personal

Full Name: Martin Trevor Heinrich

Gender: Male

Family: Wife: Julie; 2 Children: Carter, Micah

Birth Date: 10/17/1971

Birth Place: Fallon, NV

Home City: Albuquerque, NM

Religion: Lutheran

Source: Vote Smart

Education

Attended, University of New Mexico, 2001-2002

BS, Mechanical Engineering, University of Missouri, 1995

Political Experience

Senator, United States Senate, New Mexico, 2012-present

Candidate, United States Senate, 2012, 2018

Representative, United States House of Representatives, New Mexico, District 1, 2008-2012

Candidate, United States House of Representatives, New Mexico, District 1, 2008, 2010

Member, City Council, Albuquerque, 2003-2007

President, City Council, Albuquerque, 2005-2006

Professional Experience

Former Contractor, Air Force Research Laboratory at Kirtland Air Force Base

Served, AmeriCorps, United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Former Director, Coalition for New Mexico Wilderness

Founder, Heinrich Consulting, 2002-2005

Executive Director, Cottonwood Gulch Foundation, 1996-2001

Offices

Albuquerque

400 Gold Avenue SW, Ste. 1080
Albuquerque, N.M. 87102
p: (505) 346-6601
f:  (505) 346-6780Get Directions

Farmington

7450 East Main St., Ste. A
Farmington, N.M. 87402
p: (505) 325-5030
f:  (505) 325-6035Get Directions

Las Cruces

201 North Church St., Ste. 305
Las Cruces, N.M. 88001
p: (575) 523-6561
f:  (575) 523-6584Get Directions

Roswell

200 East 4th St., Ste. 300
Roswell, N.M. 88201
p: (575) 622-7113
f:  (575) 622-3538Get Directions

Santa Fe

123 East Marcy St., Ste. 103
Santa Fe, N.M. 87501
p: (505) 988-6647
f:  (505) 992-8435Get Directions

Washington D.C.

303 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
p: (202) 224-5521
f:  (202) 228-2841Get Directions

Contact

Email: Government

Web Links

Politics

Source: none

Election Results

To learn more, go to this wikipedia section in this post.

Finances

Source: Open Secrets

Committees

U.S. Senate Committee on Energy & Natural Resources

The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources plays a critical role in managing our nation’s public lands, including the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Forest Service. The committee also has jurisdiction over U.S. territories, nuclear waste policy and crafting laws that could help us shift towards cleaner energy production and more efficient uses of energy – both of which would lead to a reduction in carbon.

U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations

Senator Heinrich serves on the full committee and also as chairman of the Military Construction (MILCON), Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Subcommittee, which oversees funding for new military construction and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Military construction (MILCON) funding enables the U.S. Department of Defense and the military services to plan, design, and build hospitals, dormitories, schools, child development centers, runways and other projects both within the United States and around the world. These modern facilities support military readiness and increase the quality of life for service members and their families. Senator Heinrich also serves on the following Appropriations Subcommittees: Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies; Energy and Water Development; Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies; and Legislative Branch.

U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence

The Select Committee on Intelligence is dedicated to overseeing the United States’ intelligence community. This responsibility includes performing an annual review of the intelligence budget by the president and the preparation of legislation authorizing appropriations for the various civilian and military agencies and departments comprising the intelligence community.

U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee

A strong middle class leads to a healthy and vibrant economy. As the Vice Chair of the Joint Economic Committee, Senator Heinrich plays a role that allows me to promote policies that foster job creation through innovation and encourage the use of energy efficient technology. The committee consists of members from both the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives and helps provide citizens and lawmakers with critical information on the health of the U.S. economy and often examines how government can better work for the middle class.

New Legislation

CONGRESS.GOV  

Issues

Source: Government page

AGRICULTURE

New Mexico’s farmers, dairy producers, and ranchers help drive the state’s economy and are an integral part of our history. Many growers in New Mexico come from families who have cultivated their land for generations. Today, however, challenges such as water shortages and wildfires have made farming more difficult.
JUSTICE & CIVIL LIBERTIES
Our civil rights and liberties are only real if every American benefits from them equally.
CONSERVATION
New Mexicans’ livelihoods are rooted in our open spaces. Our public lands are where locals and visitors alike go to find the biggest elk, the best camping spot, the most challenging single track, or the greatest fishing hole.
ECONOMY & JOBS
Too many people in Washington, D.C. think that if the stock market is going up, the economy is in good shape. But that’s not the reality for working families. The way we should measure the success of the economy is if parents can afford to send their kids to college, entrepreneurs can start new businesses, and workers are able to retire with peace of mind.
EDUCATION
Students in New Mexico represent a bright future for our state. We must ensure that every student has access to a quality education, regardless of their background or zip code, their ethnicity or religion, or their gender or sexual orientation.
ENERGY
New Mexico, with its abundant wind and solar resources, can and should be at the center of America’s clean energy economy. If we make bold and pragmatic decisions now, we can bring thousands of new jobs and millions of dollars of investment to communities across our state. I’m committed to making that brighter future a reality.
HEALTH CARE & WELLNESS
Health care is a fundamental right and our goal must be to ensure that every American has access to quality, affordable care, no matter their means or where they’re from.
IMMIGRATION
My father immigrated to the United States in search of a better life – like so many before and after him. Immigrants recognize the hope that America represents; the way we treat them when they arrive shows the world who we are. Unfortunately, for decades, our nation’s broken immigration system has fallen short.
INDIAN COUNTRY
I am honored to work with the Pueblos and Tribes in New Mexico, and nationally. Native peoples have lived in the land we now call New Mexico since time immemorial. And I will continue to advocate on their behalf on issues like education, water access, housing, infrastructure, public safety, and cultural preservation, as well as defend and protect tribal sovereignty.
INNOVATION & TECHNOLOGY
I believe that innovation is what America does best. I also believe that technology and science-driven policies are how we can best meet many of our 21st century challenges.
MILITARY & NATIONAL SECURITY
Our women and men in uniform make up the strongest, best-trained, most well-equipped military in the world. New Mexicans have long answered the call of duty to serve. This tradition runs deep in our state’s history, and at times New Mexico has had the highest rate of military volunteerism of any state in the country.
NATIONAL LABS
Sandia and Los Alamos National Laboratories employ some of the best and brightest minds in the country and are indispensable to our national security. The labs also strengthen our economy by providing high-paying, high-skilled technology jobs in our state. I will always fight to protect their missions and create a sustainable future for the innovative research and development at our labs.
TRANSPORTATION & INFRASTRUCTURE
A safe, efficient transportation system and strong basic infrastructure helps move New Mexico forward and supports our local economy.
TWO-GENERATION ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT ACT
The federal government’s current approach to poverty is not effective enough. Although we have data demonstrating what works, many of the federally funded programs intended to help families are disjointed and difficult to navigate for both families in need and for organizations trying to provide help.
VETERANS
One of my most important responsibilities as your Senator is to keep America’s promise to our service members and their families so that when our troops return home, they receive quality care and the benefits they have earned.

More Information

Services

Source: Government page

Wikipedia

Martin Trevor Heinrich (/ˈhnrɪk/ HYNE-rik; born October 17, 1971) is an American businessman and politician serving as the senior United States senator from New Mexico, a seat he has held since 2013. A member of the Democratic Party, Heinrich served as the U.S. representative from New Mexico’s 1st congressional district from 2009 to 2013. He is the dean of New Mexico’s congressional delegation.

Born in Fallon, Nevada, Heinrich lived much of his adulthood in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and maintains a residence there along with his work residence in Silver Spring, Maryland.[1][2] From 2004 to 2008, he served on the Albuquerque City Council, representing the 6th district. Heinrich was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2008 and reelected in 2010.

In lieu of running for a third term in the House, Heinrich ran for the Senate seat vacated by retiring Senator Jeff Bingaman in the 2012 election and defeated Republican Heather Wilson, 51%–45%. He was reelected in 2018, receiving 54% of the vote in a three-way race. Since the beginning of the 118th Congress, Heinrich has chaired the Joint Economic Committee, having previously served as vice chair.

Early life and education

Martin Trevor Heinrich was born in Fallon, near Carson City, Nevada. He is the son of seamstress Shirley A. (née Bybee) and Pete C. Heinrich, a utility company lineman.[3][4] His father was born in Waldenburg, Germany, as Heinrich Peter Karl Cordes and later took his stepfather Olaf Heinrich’s surname. When he was naturalized as an American citizen in 1955, he changed his name again to Pete Carl Heinrich.[5] Raised as a Lutheran, Martin Heinrich grew up in Cole Camp, Missouri.[6] He attended public schools in Cole Camp, then moved to Columbia, Missouri, in 1989 to attend the University of Missouri. He graduated in 1995 with a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering.[4] He left Missouri for Albuquerque to take graduate courses at the University of New Mexico.[7]

Early career

After a brief stint doing mechanical drawings,[4] Heinrich worked as an AmeriCorps fellow in New Mexico.[8]

From 1996 to 2001 Heinrich served as executive director of the Cottonwood Gulch Foundation, a New Mexico nonprofit organization dedicated to educating young people on natural science and the environment.[7] In 2002 he founded his own public affairs consulting firm.[4][7]

Heinrich served on the Albuquerque City Council from 2004 to 2008, including one term as city council president in 2006.[9][10] As a city councilman, he said his goals were to reduce crime, raise the minimum wage and create new jobs. He also advocated the use of wind and solar power.[7]

In February 2006 Governor Bill Richardson appointed Heinrich to be the state’s Natural Resources Trustee.[11]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2008

In 2008 Heinrich filed papers to run in New Mexico’s 1st congressional district, based in Albuquerque. He originally planned to challenge five-term Republican incumbent Heather Wilson, but Wilson retired to run for the U.S. Senate seat vacated by retiring Republican Pete Domenici.[12] Heinrich won the Democratic primary on June 4, 2008, defeating New Mexico Secretary of State Rebecca Vigil-Giron, State Health Secretary Michelle Lujan Grisham, and U.S. Army veteran Robert Pidcock, 44–25–24–8%.[13][14]

In the general election Heinrich faced Bernalillo County Sheriff Darren White, whom Heinrich’s campaign focused on linking to President George W. Bush.[15] Heinrich also called for energy independence and an end to the war in Iraq.[15] He defeated White, 56–44%, carrying three of the district’s five counties: Bernalillo (56%), Sandoval (56%), and Valencia (53%). White won Santa Fe (64%) and Torrance (57%) counties.[16] Upon his swearing in on January 3, 2009, Heinrich became the first Democrat to represent the district. It had been in Republican hands since New Mexico was split into districts in 1969 but has become increasingly friendly to Democrats in recent years; it has gone Democratic in every presidential election since 1992.

2010

Heinrich was challenged by Republican Jon Barela, who told Politico he did not believe Heinrich reflected the district, saying he was too far left on budget and spending issues.[17] During the 2010 campaign Roll Call reported that the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee assigned a lobbyist to aid in the reelection campaigns of possibly vulnerable House members in fundraising, messaging and campaign strategy.[18] Heinrich was elected to a second term, defeating Barela 52–48%, and carrying two of the district’s counties: Bernalillo (53%) and Sandoval (51%). Barela won Santa Fe (67%), Torrance (61%), and Valencia (53%) counties.[19]

Tenure

U.S. Representative Martin Heinrich during the 111th Congress

On January 14, 2009, the House Democratic freshmen elected Heinrich to a six-month term as their class president.[20] He co-sponsored the Stop the Congressional Pay Raise Act, which would cancel an automatic $4,700 salary raise for members of Congress.[21]

Health care

On March 21, 2010, Heinrich voted for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (commonly called Obamacare or the Affordable Care Act).[22] In 2017 he co-sponsored Medicare-For-All.[23]

Abortion

NARAL Pro-Choice America PAC endorsed Heinrich in 2010.[24][25]

Heinrich received a 100% score from NARAL in 2009.[26]

Environment

Heinrich has identified as an environmentalist throughout his career. He served as executive director of the Cottonwood Gulch Foundation,[27] a New Mexico nonprofit organization dedicated to educating young people on natural science and the environment, and founded his own public affairs consulting firm.[7]

Later, as a member of the Albuquerque City Council, he advocated for the use of wind and solar power.[7] In February 2006 Governor Bill Richardson appointed him to be the state’s Natural Resources Trustee.[11] He also served on the executive committee of the Sierra Club’s Rio Grande Chapter.[28] In August 2011 he received the Sierra Club‘s first endorsement of the 2012 election cycle.[28][29] He opposes construction of the Keystone Pipeline. He supports cap-and-trade legislation.[30] In April 2019 Heinrich was one of three Democratic senators who joined Republicans to vote to confirm David Bernhardt, a former oil executive, as Secretary of the Interior Department.[31]

In late 2019, Heinrich was one of 14 senators to co-sponsor the Green New Deal, a policy introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate that would establish net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.[32]

Same-sex marriage

After his 2012 Senate primary opponent, Hector Balderas, announced his support for same-sex marriage,[33] Heinrich’s staff released a statement to The New Mexico Independent newspaper stating, “Martin has supported gay marriage for some time. I just don’t think he was asked about it. Thanks for asking!”[34] He was an original cosponsor of Congressman Jerry Nadler‘s 2009 legislation to repeal the Defense of Marriage Act.[35]

Gun law

Heinrich is an outdoorsman, hunter, gun owner, and former member of the National Rifle Association (NRA).[36] The NRA endorsed him during the 2010 congressional election. At that time the NRA gave him a grade of A for his stance on Second Amendment rights.[37] The NRA did not support Heinrich during his 2012 Senate campaign and he has since donated their 2010 contribution to charity.[36]

Heinrich opposed legislation that would have reinstated the Federal Assault Weapons Ban.[38] He also supported bills to create a national standard for the concealed carrying of firearms across state lines, co-sponsored legislation that would ease the restrictions on the sales of firearms across state lines, and called for the repeal of the Dickey Amendment, which prevents government research into curbing gun violence.[36][39] He supports banning bump stocks and banning sales to anyone on the federal no-fly list.[40]

Ojito Wilderness

In 2008 the New Mexico Republican Party criticized Heinrich for his work on the creation of the Ojito National Wilderness, which they said amounted to unregistered lobbying. Heinrich responded that the work was advocacy that did not require lobbying disclosure.[41]

Armed forces

Heinrich was a member of the House Armed Services Committee.[42] During his time in Congress he has maintained strong opposition to the war in Iraq, and supports a swift end of combat operations in Afghanistan.[43] In 2011 he voted against the National Defense Authorization Act conference report because he objected to language requiring that suspected foreign terrorists be taken into custody by the military instead of civilian law enforcement authorities.[44]

Committee assignments

U.S. Senate

Elections

2012

Heinrich announced that he would leave the House to run for the United States Senate seat held by Jeff Bingaman, who retired at the end of his term.[45] In March, Politico reported that Al Gore had signed a fundraising letter for Heinrich.[46] Heinrich defeated State Auditor Hector Balderas in the Democratic primary.[47] He defeated Republican Heather Wilson, his predecessor in Congress, in the November 6 general election, 51% to 45%.[citation needed]

2018

Heinrich was reelected to a second term in 2018 over Republican Mick Rich and Libertarian Gary Johnson.[48] He gained 54% of the vote to Rich’s 30% and Johnson’s 15%.

Tenure

116th Congress (2019–2021)

Heinrich being sworn in as a U.S. Senator by vice president Joe Biden, January 3, 2013

In November 2020, Heinrich was named a candidate for secretary of the interior in the Biden administration.[49][50] This position ultimately went to fellow New Mexican Deb Haaland, who held the same House seat Heinrich held until his election to the Senate.

117th Congress (2021–2023)

Heinrich was participating in the certification of the 2021 United States Electoral College vote count when Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol. He left the chamber to make a phone call and saw that the rioters were overwhelming the Capitol Police. He returned to the chamber to tell people what he saw: “an out of control mob climbing over things, waving Confederate flags, just clearly bent on breaking into the west side of the Capitol.”[51] Along with other senators, Heinrich was evacuated from the Senate chamber to an undisclosed location.[52] He called the attack an “assault on democracy” and blamed Trump.[53] In the wake of the attack, Heinrich said invoking the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution and/or impeachment would be appropriate to remove Trump.[51][54]

Gun laws

On April 17, 2013, Heinrich voted to expand background checks for gun purchases,[55] and against regulating assault weapons.[56]

In response to the 2017 Las Vegas shooting, Heinrich said that Congress should pass legislation to combat gun violence.[57]

Health care

On September 27, 2013, Heinrich voted to restore funding for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as part of an amendment to legislation funding government operations for 45 days, and which also omitted House-passed language prioritizing debt payments if Congress fails to increase the nation’s borrowing limits.[58]

Election security

On December 21, 2017, Heinrich was one of six senators to introduce the Secure Elections Act, legislation authorizing block grants to states to update outdated voting technology as well as form a program for an independent panel of experts that would work to develop cybersecurity guidelines for election systems that states could implement, along with offering states resources to install the recommendations.[59]

Energy

In February 2021, Heinrich was one of seven Democratic U.S. Senators to join Republicans in blocking a ban of hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking.[60]

Puerto Rico

On March 16, 2021, Heinrich introduced a bill to grant Puerto Rico statehood.[61]

Foreign policy

In January 2024, Heinrich voted for a resolution, proposed by Bernie Sanders, to apply the human rights provisions of the Foreign Assistance Act to U.S. aid to Israel’s military. The proposal was defeated, 72 to 11.[62]

Committee assignments

Heinrich served on the following Senate committees in the 118th Congress:[63]

In March 2019, Heinrich and Rob Portman co-founded the Senate Artificial Intelligence Caucus.[64] On April 15, 2020, the Trump administration invited Heinrich to join a bipartisan task force on reopening the economy amid the COVID-19 pandemic.[65]

Bipartisan survival trip

In 2014, Heinrich and Senator Jeff Flake traveled to Eru, a small island in the Marshall Islands. The Discovery Channel sent a film crew to document their trip and planned to air the film for a show called Rival Survival. Heinrich and Flake had to survive for six days with few resources, including no natural sources of drinkable water. After the trip, Heinrich told reporters that he and Flake, a Republican, decided to do it to demonstrate that politicians from different political parties can work together, in their case to survive.[66][67]

Electoral history

Albuquerque City Council

2003 Albuquerque City Council election, District 6[68]
PartyCandidateVotes%
NonpartisanMartin Heinrich 2,342 39.85
NonpartisanJohanna Tighe1,12919.21
NonpartisanLinda Doran75812.90
NonpartisanBob Anderson62010.55
NonpartisanDona Upson5849.94
NonpartisanJavier Martinez4327.35
Write-in120.20
Total votes5,877 100.00

U.S. House of Representatives

2008 New Mexico’s 1st congressional district election – Democratic primary[69]
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticMartin Heinrich 22,341 43.51
DemocraticRebecca Vigil-Giron12,66024.66
DemocraticMichelle Lujan Grisham12,07423.51
DemocraticRobert L. Pidcock4,2738.32
Total votes51,348 100.00
Majority9,68118.85
2008 New Mexico’s 1st congressional district election[70]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticMartin Heinrich 166,271 55.65 Increase5.85
RepublicanDarren White132,48544.35Decrease5.85
Total votes298,756 100.00 N/A
Majority33,78611.31Increase10.90
Democratic gain from Republican
2010 New Mexico’s 1st congressional district election – Democratic primary[71]
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticMartin Heinrich (incumbent) 32,173 100.00
Total votes32,173 100.00
2010 New Mexico’s 1st congressional district election[72]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticMartin Heinrich (incumbent) 112,010 51.80 Decrease3.85
RepublicanJon Barela104,21548.20Increase3.85
Total votes216,225 100.00 N/A
Majority7,7953.61Decrease7.70
Democratic hold

U.S. Senate

2012 United States Senate election in New Mexico – Democratic primary[73]
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticMartin Heinrich 83,432 58.94
DemocraticHector Balderas58,12841.06
Total votes141,560 100.00
Majority25,30417.88
2012 United States Senate election in New Mexico[74]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticMartin Heinrich 395,717 51.01 Decrease19.60
RepublicanHeather Wilson351,25945.28Increase15.95
Independent AmericanJon Barrie28,1993.63N/A
IndependentRobert L. Anderson (write-in)6170.08N/A
Total votes775,792 100.00 N/A
Majority44,4585.73Decrease35.54
Democratic hold
2018 United States Senate election in New Mexico – Democratic primary[75]
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticMartin Heinrich (incumbent) 152,145 100.00
Total votes152,145 100.00
2018 United States Senate election in New Mexico[76]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticMartin Heinrich (incumbent) 376,998 54.09 Increase3.08
RepublicanMick Rich212,81330.53Decrease14.75
LibertarianGary Johnson107,20115.38N/A
Total votes697,012 100.00 N/A
Majority164,18523.56Increase17.83
Democratic hold

References

  1. ^ “On the (hiking) trail with Heinrich”. The NM Political Report. September 12, 2018. Retrieved December 31, 2021. Heinrich and his wife still own a house in southeast Albuquerque.
  2. ^ “Heinrich moves his family to D.C. area – Albuquerque Journal”. www.abqjournal.com. Retrieved December 31, 2021.
  3. ^ “Martin Heinrich genealogy”. Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com. Archived from the original on July 27, 2013. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  4. ^ a b c d Coleman, Michael (September 19, 2012). “Democrat Martin Heinrich Seeks U.S. Senate Seat”. Albuquerque Journal. Archived from the original on January 15, 2021. Retrieved January 2, 2013.
  5. ^ Batesville, Inc. “Obituary for Pete Carl Heinrich at Fenton-Kendrick Funeral Home”. www.fentonfuneralchapel.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2020. {{cite web}}: |first= has generic name (help)
  6. ^ Keller, Rudi (December 9, 2012). “U.S. Senate will have trio of MU graduates”. Columbia Daily Tribune. Archived from the original on January 15, 2021. Retrieved May 29, 2018.
  7. ^ a b c d e f “Martin’s Story”. Martin Heinrich for Congress. Archived from the original on October 11, 2007.
  8. ^ “Sen. Martin Heinrich”. Sunlight Foundation. Archived from the original on August 2, 2014. Retrieved August 16, 2014.
  9. ^ “Albuquerque City Council 6”. ourcampaigns.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2021. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  10. ^ “Heinrich, Martin (D)”. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 6, 2009.
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External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Mexico’s 1st congressional district

2009–2013
Succeeded by

Party political offices
Preceded by

Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from New Mexico
(Class 1)

2012, 2018, 2024
Most recent
U.S. Senate
Preceded by

Jeff Bingaman
United States Senator (Class 1) from New Mexico
2013–present
Served alongside: Tom Udall, Ben Ray Luján
Incumbent
Preceded by

Chair of the Joint Economic Committee
2023–present
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

as United States Senator from Nebraska

Order of precedence of the United States
as United States Senator from New Mexico

since January 3, 2013
Succeeded by

as United States Senator from Hawaii

Preceded by

United States senators by seniority
48th
Succeeded by


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